Open-ended Maths: a selection of 101qs favourites

The 101qs website was created in 2012 by Dan Meyer, a great Maths teacher and dedicated apostle of open-ended Maths.

‘Open-ended Maths’ is an expression that sounds pretty scary to many Maths teachers. A lot worse than ‘out of the textbook’, which is rather trendy and flattering. Dan Meyer’s first paragraph on his About page does not seek to cajole them back to their comfort zone either:

We don’t care how well you lecture. We don’t care how well you engage us. We aren’t impressed by your fancy slide transitions or your interactive whiteboard. We care how well you perplex us.

This sets the tone perfectly: open-ended Maths is about stimulating students by presenting them with a perplexing picture or video — perplexing in the sense that it raises questions. Students have to formulate the questions themselves and subsequently solve them, which often means developing appropriate resources on the way.

If you are a regular reader of my posts, you know by now that this blog is not about being ‘for’ or ‘against’, but understanding precisely WHY and HOW an idea is potentially useful for teaching Maths. In this instance, it so happens that open-ended Maths is not only cool, it is also an essential teaching tool — for reasons I shall explain in a later post — on the condition that it is not used systematically (for reasons I shall also explain).

Read More »

Stephen Hawking, the ultimate teacher

This post is an ‘extension’ of the previous post concerning the Magic of Q&A beyond expectations.

Back in May 2015, thousands of people gathered at Sydney Opera House for a talk by Stephen Hawking. Appearing in 3D hologram form, beamed in from Cambridge University, the physicist was asked the following question by an audience member: ‘What do you think is the cosmological effect of Zayn leaving One Direction, and consequently breaking the heart of millions of teenage girls across the world ?’Read More »

The magic of Q&A beyond expectations

It is always very stimulating when questions and answers in a Maths lesson suddenly go beyond all expectations.

This might sound like this is something that only happens exceptionally. Not so. In a class where a climate of questions and answers has been set in mutual trust, exceeding expectations happens almost every day.

In this post, I would like to show two such examples, one where my expectations as a teacher were exceeded, and another where a student improved his own conceptual understanding starting from a misconception – which was of great benefit to the whole class.Read More »